Online Homeschool Curriculum - Sample Lesson (Lesson 1 Only)


Lesson 1: Rain

Week: 1

The narrator wishes the rain would go away so 'little Johnny' can play outside.

Lesson 2: The Clock

Week: 1

The poem encourages children to be helpful and promotes habits of cleanliness.

Lesson 3: Fingers and Toes

Week: 1

The poem is a riddle which demonstrates the importance of proper punctuation. Upon a first reading, the poem seems to make outlandish claims (every lady has 20 nails on each hand and every lady has 25 nails on hands and feet). Upon further examination, the poem only makes true statements (every lady has 20 nails, every lady has 5 nails upon each hand, and every lady has 20 nails upon hands and feet).

Lesson 4: The Old Woman Under a Hill

Week: 2

The poem is a logic joke which states two things that together must obviously be true. 'If the woman is not gone from her house under the hill, she lives there still.'

Lesson 5: Oh, Dear!

Week: 2

Two old women climb an apple tree and come down at different times.

Lesson 6: Pat-A-Cake

Week: 2

The narrator asks the baker's man to make a cake and gives him specific directions.

Lesson 7: Jack

Week: 3

Nimble Jack jumps over a candlestick.

Lesson 8: Baby Dolly

Week: 3

A little girl offers food to her fussy doll if the doll won't cry.

Lesson 9: Bees

Week: 3

The poem captures when bees are needed for fertilizing crops.

Lesson 10: If Wishes Were Horses

Week: 4

The poem or proverb compares the usefulness and availability of things.

Lesson 11: To Market

Week: 4

The narrator goes to market, buys a fat pig, and brings the pig home.

Lesson 12: Robin and Richard

Week: 4

Two brothers oversleep.

Lesson 13: The Clever Hen

Week: 5

The narrator's hen works hard and entertains the narrator with stories.

Lesson 14: Lucy Locket

Week: 5

Lucy Locket loses her pocket. Kitty Fisher returns it to her empty.

Lesson 15: Two Birds

Week: 5

Two birds sit on a stone. One by one they fly away, leaving the stone alone.

Lesson 16: Barber

Week: 6

A barber shaves a pig and will use the hair to make a wig.

Lesson 17: The Flying Pig

Week: 6

A pig flies into the air, but a man in brown brings him back down.

Lesson 18: Hush-a-bye

Week: 6

A baby in a cradle rocking in a tree falls.

Lesson 19: The Three Wise Men of Gotham

Week: 7

Three men set out to sea in a bowl. They never come back.

Lesson 20: Pippen Hill

Week: 7

A man spots a lady on Pippen Hill. She's so pretty, that if he had money he'd spend it on her.

Lesson 21: Pussy-cat and Queen

Week: 7

The pussy-cat travels to London to see the Queen. While there, the cat scares a mouse under a chair.

Lesson 22: Heigh-Ho, The Carrion Crow

Week: 8

A crow watches a tailor making a cloak. The tailor shoots an arrow at the crow and misses, hitting his own pig instead.

Lesson 23: Christmas

Week: 8

The poem points out that Christmas is short but lots of fun.

Lesson 24: ABC

Week: 8

The poem points out that Christmas is brief but lots of fun.

Lesson 25: Banbury Cross

Week: 9

A lady rides a horse to Banbury Cross with bells on her toes, making music wherever she goes.

Lesson 26: The Man in our Town

Week: 9

A man jumps in a bush and scratches his eyes. He jumps into another bush and fixes them.

Lesson 27: Georgy Porgy

Week: 9

Georgy kisses girls and makes them cry until he sees the boys. Then he runs away.

Lesson 28: Wee Willie Winkie

Week: 10

Wee Willie Winkie runs through the town, making sure the children are in bed. Some interpretations of the poem view Willie Winkie as a personification of sleep visiting all the children.

Lesson 29: See-saw

Week: 10

This poem contains a rhyme for children to recite as they move up and down on a seesaw.

Lesson 30: About the Bush

Week: 10

The narrator walks about a bush and a beehive and meets Willie.

Lesson 31: Five Toes

Week: 11

The poem refers to each of the five toes on a little foot.

Lesson 32: Three Blind Mice

Week: 11

The three blind mice chase a farmer's wife.

Lesson 33: A Little Man

Week: 11

A man shoots a female duck and brings it home for his wife to cook. He then goes to shoot a male duck, but misses.

Lesson 34: Doctor Foster

Week: 12

Doctor Foster goes to Glo'ster and steps in a deep puddle. He never goes back again.

Lesson 35: Diddle Diddle Dumpling

Week: 12

John falls asleep with his breeches and one sock still on.

Lesson 36: The Black Hen

Week: 12

A black hen lays eggs for gentlemen.

Lesson 37: A Candle

Week: 13

The poem is a riddle. The poem's title is the answer. Nanny Etticoat is a white (petticoat) candle with a red flame (nose) that grows shorter as it burns.

Lesson 38: Curly-locks

Week: 13

The narrator asks Curly-locks to be his and promises a leisurely life of sitting on cushions and eating strawberries and cream.

Lesson 39: Humpty Dumpty

Week: 13

Humpty Dumpty, the egg, falls, breaks, and can't be fixed.

Lesson 40: Pins

Week: 14

The poem provides the reader advice, waste not want not, even if it is only a pin on the floor.

Lesson 41: Goosey, Goosey, Gander

Week: 14

The narrator asks the Goose where it had wandered, then speaks of a man they punished for not saying their prayers.

Lesson 42: Blue Bell Boy

Week: 14

The narrator first says that a boy does his work well, then contradicts themselves by describing the boy as clumsy and failing his tasks.

Lesson 43: The Mouse and the Clock

Week: 15

A mouse runs up a clock. When the clock gong signals that it is one o'clock, the mouse runs back down.

Lesson 44: Jack Jelf

Week: 15

A boy is placed on a shelf due to his difficulties with spelling. He cannot spell 'pie.'

Lesson 45: Jack Sprat

Week: 15

The poem remarks on cooperation between a husband and a wife. One eats fat, the other lean, and together they cooperate to eat everything and waste nothing.

Lesson 46: Hush-a-bye

Week: 16

A daddy takes care of a baby. He talks or sings the poem to calm the baby.

Lesson 47: The Girl in the Lane

Week: 16

A girl who has difficulty speaking meets a man who has difficulty walking.

Lesson 48: Nancy Dawson

Week: 16

Nancy Dawson lies in bed and does not work.

Lesson 49: The Alphabet

Week: 17

A poem to be read or recited aloud for learning the alphabet.

Lesson 50: Jack and Jill

Week: 17

Jack and Jill fall down a hill while trying to get water from a well. Jack runs to Dame Dob to fix his hurt head.

Lesson 51: Dance to Your Daddy

Week: 17

A woman tells her a boy to greet his father by dancing (or walking) to him when his father returns from a fishing trip.

Lesson 52: Robin Hood and Little John

Week: 18

Robin Hood prays for the safe return of his friend, Little John, who has ventured into town.

Lesson 53: One Misty Moisty Morning

Week: 18

A young girl meets an old man. He compliments her and she smiles.

Lesson 54: The Old Woman from France

Week: 18

An old woman tries to teach children to dance. When the children are too stiff, she sends them home.

Lesson 55: The Old Man

Week: 19

An old man kisses a maid and gives her a coin, but it is broken.

Lesson 56: My Kitten

Week: 19

The narrator says an ode to their kitten.

Lesson 57: T'Other Little Tune

Week: 19

The narrator expresses her desire to leave her father, to become the fiddler's wife, and to have music in her life.

Lesson 58: Pancake Day

Week: 20

Pancake day is a day in Great Britain before lent, where people make pancakes to use up eggs and milk. There is also some ball throwing mentioned in the poem, suggesting children playing catch might recite it in rhythm with the toss of the ball.

Lesson 59: Forehead, Eyes, Cheeks, Nose, Mouth, and Chin

Week: 20

This poem is a finger-play game. Touch the forehead, eyes, cheeks, nose, mouth, and chin while reciting the poem.

Lesson 60: A Sure Test

Week: 20

The narrator tickles a little boy's knee. If he smiles or laughs he is not a gentleman.

Lesson 61: The Merchants of London

Week: 21

The poem discusses the fancy dress of the merchants of London.

Lesson 62: I'll Tell You a Story

Week: 21

The narrator says they'll tell stories, but tells no stories.

Lesson 63: To Babylon

Week: 21

Two narrators discuss how far it is to Babylon and whether they can travel there at night.

Lesson 64: Sleep Baby Sleep

Week: 22

The poem is a lullaby. The narrator tries to sing their baby to sleep.

Lesson 65: Little Fred

Week: 22

Little Fred says his prayers, gives kisses, and goes to bed without complaint.

Lesson 66: Baa Baa Black Sheep

Week: 22

The narrator asks if there is wool, and the sheep answers there is wool for his master and his dame.

Lesson 67: The Cat and the Fiddle

Week: 23

The cat has a fiddle, the cow jumps over the moon, the dog laughs, and the dish and spoon run away.

Lesson 68: Jack and His Fiddle

Week: 23

The narrator asks Jack to give up his fiddle. Fiddling is getting in the way of Jack's success. Jack won't give up his fiddle because it makes him happy.

Lesson 69: Buttons

Week: 23

The narrator sells buttons by calling out the poem to the people passing by.

Lesson 70: Little Pussy

Week: 24

The narrator discusses how to treat a kitty nicely.

Lesson 71: Sing a Song of Sixpence

Week: 24

The king is served a pie of live blackbirds and counts his money, the queen eats bread and honey in the parlor, and the maid gets bitten on the nose by a blackbird.

Lesson 72: Tommy Tittlemouse

Week: 24

Tommy lives in a small house and catches fish where he can.

Lesson 73: The Hobby-Horse

Week: 25

The narrator sells their toy horse and seems to regret it. The narrator vows never to sing again until they get something of equal value, in this case, a new coat.

Lesson 74: Boy and the Sparrow

Week: 25

A boy tries to shoot a sparrow to make stew and pie, but the sparrow escapes.

Lesson 75: Old Woman, Old Woman

Week: 25

A woman in a basket travels higher than the moon to sweep the cobwebs from the sky.

Lesson 76: Two Pigeons

Week: 26

Two of the narrator's pigeons fly away for an unknown reason.

Lesson 77: The First of May

Week: 26

The poem advises that a person who rises early and bathes often will remain healthy and attractive.

Lesson 78: Sulky Sue

Week: 26

A girl (or perhaps a doll) must face the corner for being sulky.

Lesson 79: Saturday, Saturday

Week: 27

A woman spends time Saturday night getting ready to spend time with her true love on Sunday.

Lesson 80: Little Jenny Wren

Week: 27

When Jenny Wren gets sick, Robin cares for her and Jenny proclaims to care for him. When Jenny gets well, she breaks up with Robin.

Lesson 81: Bobby Snooks

Week: 27

Bobby Snooks is a good boy who studies and is loved. Jack Spry gets into trouble and ends up with a black eye and a broken nose.

Lesson 82: The Little Moppet

Week: 28

A beggar steals a child's doll.

Lesson 83: The Man in the Moon

Week: 28

The Man in the Moon falls down, starts for Norwich, and burns his mouth on cold porridge.

Lesson 84: My Love

Week: 28

The narrator looks for a woman, asking others if they've seen her.

Lesson 85: Hark! Hark!

Week: 29

The dogs bark. The beggars are coming to town.

Lesson 86: The Man of Bombay

Week: 29

A bird steals a pipe from the Man of Bombay. The man becomes angry.

Lesson 87: Poor Old Robinson Crusoe

Week: 29

Robinson Crusoe wears a coat made of goat's skin. Robinson Crusoe is a literary character who was stranded on a desert island for years.

Lesson 88: My Maid Mary

Week: 30

Mary handles chores around the home while the narrator handles the crops.

Lesson 89: I Love Sixpence

Week: 30

The narrator spends some of his money and brings the rest home to his wife. It is unclear whether the wife knows the man does not bring home all his earnings.

Lesson 90: Comical Folk

Week: 30

This silly poem states the obvious, that the 'comical' man and women eat and drink and therefore can sleep, walk, talk, and see.

Lesson 91: Cock-crow

Week: 31

The poem gives advice for successful living - early to bed and early to rise.

Lesson 92: Tommy Snooks

Week: 31

Tommy asks Bessy if she will marry him the very next day.

Lesson 93: The Blacksmith

Week: 31

The narrator asks a blacksmith to shoe his horse. The blacksmith agrees and does the job.

Lesson 94: Cock-A-Doodle-Doo

Week: 32

The fiddler loses his stick and can't play. The lady loses her shoe and cannot dance. The narrator nonsensically claims the lady will dance without her shoe until the fiddler finds his stick.

Lesson 95: Dapple-Gray

Week: 32

A boy lends his pony to a lady. The lady mistreats the pony. The boy vows never to lend his pony again.

Lesson 96: Coffee and Tea

Week: 32

Two sisters fight and fall out because one likes tea and the other likes coffee.

Lesson 97: The Little Girl with a Curl

Week: 33

The narrator describes a little girl, who acts in the extreme. She is either very good or plain horrid.

Lesson 98: A Cock and Bull Story

Week: 33

Taken literally, 'A Cock and Bull Story' is a story of exaggerations. The poem claims a rooster is blowing horn, cows are threshing corn, and maids are making hay.

Lesson 99: Candle-Saving

Week: 33

Honest John advises all that the only way to save candles is to put them out.

Lesson 100: Over the Water

Week: 34

The narrator makes a cake for 'her Charley.'

Lesson 101: Old Grimes

Week: 34

The narrator reminisces about Old Grimes and his coat.

Lesson 102: Ladybird

Week: 34

The narrator tries to convince a ladybug to fly away by telling tall tales.

Lesson 103: Caesar's Song

Week: 35

The narrator asks a dog who the dog belongs to. The dog tells the narrator he belongs to Tom Tinker.

Lesson 104: As I was Going Along

Week: 35

The narrator sings and walks a long time.

Lesson 105: Little Jack Horner

Week: 35

Jack puts his thumb in a pie, pulls out a plumb, and says he is a good boy.

Lesson 106: Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary

Week: 36

The narrator asks Mary about her garden. Mary describes her garden. There are silver bells, cockle shells, and pretty maids lined up in a row.

Lesson 107: Mary's Canary

Week: 36

Mary has a pretty bird. She enjoys listening to the bird sing.

Lesson 108: The Little Bird

Week: 36

The narrator sees a little bird and asks it to stay, but it flies away.