Online Homeschool Curriculum - Sample Lesson (Lesson 1 Only)


Lesson 1: The Frog Who Wished to be as Big as the Ox

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 1

A frog puffs up to grow as big as an ox and bursts into little bits.

Lesson 2: The Grasshopper and the Ant

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 1

A grasshopper sings all summer instead of saving food for winter and goes hungry.

Lesson 3: The Cat and the Fox

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 2

A cat and fox take things that don't belong to them. The fox brags about knowing many tricks, while the cat knows just one. When dogs chase the cat and fox, the cat's one trick of climbing a tree saves him, while the fox's many tricks fail him.

Lesson 4: The Hen with the Golden Eggs

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 2

A hen lays eggs of gold. The greedy man who owns the hen foolishly kills her to get at the gold inside. The greedy man finds no gold inside the hen and has destroyed the source of his gold.

Lesson 5: The Dog and His Image

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 3

A dog holding a bone in his mouth sees his reflection. Feeling greedy, he tries to grab the bone from his reflection and loses his bone in the water.

Lesson 6: The Acorn and the Pumpkin

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 3

A country bumpkin thinks pumpkins should grow on oak trees and acorns should grow on pumpkin vines until an acorn falls off a tree and hits him on the nose.

Lesson 7: The Raven and the Fox

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 4

A raven up in a tree holds a tasty treat in his beak that a fox would like to eat. The fox falsely flatters the bird, inciting the raven to sing, even though ravens make ugly caws. When the raven squawks, the tasty morsel falls into the fox's mouth.

Lesson 8: The City Mouse and the Country Mouse

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 4

A country mouse visits a city mouse and samples the delicious foods the city has to offer. When they hear a noise, the country mouse flees back to the country, valuing safety and serenity over decadence.

Lesson 9: The Lion and the Gnat

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 5

A gnat mocks and stings a lion, turning the lion's strength against himself. The sassy gnat gets his comeuppance when he becomes entangled in a web and eaten by a spider.

Lesson 10: The Dove and the Ant

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 5

A dove rescues an ant from drowning. Later, the ant rescues the dove from a man with a slingshot.

Lesson 11: The Fox and the Grapes

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 6

A fox tries to get some grapes but they are out of reach. The fox says the grapes are sour and he doesn't really want them anyway.

Lesson 12: The Ass in the Lion's Skin

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 6

A donkey dresses in a lion's skin, scaring others. A man spots his ears, realizes he is a donkey, and leads him about.

Lesson 13: The Fox and the Stork

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 7

A fox invites a stork to dinner, but serves soup on a plate that makes it impossible for the stork to eat. In return, the stork does the same to the fox.

Lesson 14: The Monkey and the Cat

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 7

A monkey flatters a cat into sneaking roasting chestnuts from the fire. The monkey gobbles the chestnuts up while the cat only ends up a with burned paw and an empty belly.

Lesson 15: The Hare and the Tortoise

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 8

A hare and a tortoise race. Even though the hare is far faster, he suffers from overconfidence, doesn't try his hardest, and the tortoise wins the race.

Lesson 16: The Heron Who Was Hard to Please

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 8

A hungry stork goes fishing. He ignores the numerous fish swimming around, waiting for something better to swim along. Eventually the fish disappear, nothing better comes by, and he must settle for a snail.

Lesson 17: The Raven Who Would Rival the Eagle

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 9

A raven sees an eagle grab up a sheep and tries to do the same. The raven fails, becoming tangled in the wool of the sheep. The shepherd comes along and puts the raven in a cage.

Lesson 18: The Miller, His Son, and the Ass

By: Jean de La Fontaine

Week: 9

A miller and his son bring a donkey to market. They overreact and jump to follow the advice of all the people passing by, eventually realizing they should trust their own judgement.

Lesson 19: The Fairies

By: William Allingham

Week: 10

The poem describes the lives and hijinks of a group of fairies, including their king and queen. They scare hunters, plant trees, steal children, and get revenge.

Lesson 20: The Elf Singing

By: William Allingham

Week: 10

The poem tells the tale of a snake that tried to eat a fairy. The fairy's song uplifts him and saves him while the snake falls and is eaten by a mole.

Lesson 21: The Fairy King

By: William Allingham

Week: 11

The Witch of the Wold grabs the old Fairy King's crown and puts it on her head. In a twist, stealing and wearing the crown vanquishes the queen. She disappears, and the king grows young.

Lesson 22: Chorus of Fairies

By: William Allingham

Week: 11

The poem describes a delightful summer day of work and play.

Lesson 23: Robin Redbreast

By: William Allingham

Week: 12

The poem narrator warns a robin that summer is ending and winter is near, describing the changes in weather, flora, fauna the accompany the fall.

Lesson 24: Amy Margaret

By: William Allingham

Week: 12

The poem describes a little girl named Amy Margaret in glowing terms.

Lesson 25: Jingle, Jangle!

By: William Allingham

Week: 13

The poem describes an unruly group of children in humorous terms.

Lesson 26: Dreaming

By: William Allingham

Week: 13

The poem first describes a dream slipping down from the sky to slide under the eyelids of a little boy and then relates the fantastical dream experienced by boy.

Lesson 27: I Love You, Dear

By: William Allingham

Week: 14

The poem expresses one person's deep love for another, perhaps an instructor's love for a child.

Lesson 28: Seasons

By: William Allingham

Week: 14

The poem describes what the narrator cherishes about each of the four seasons of spring, summer, fall, and winter.

Lesson 29: The Cat and the Dog

By: William Allingham

Week: 15

A man tells a cat and dog that one can stay inside the house and the other must live outside. Both cat and dog want to live inside, so they race for it. During the race, the dog is hit by a beggar man's staff and loses the race. Outside the dog stays, and the dog has barked at beggars ever since.

Lesson 30: Here and There

By: William Allingham

Week: 15

The poem/song/lay asks where a series of children are by name, ponders the fantastical, and then states each child is safe right there.

Lesson 31: The Bird

By: William Allingham

Week: 16

A child tries to convince a bird to become her pet. The odd verses (1, 3, ...) are the child's arguments and the even verses are the bird's replies. In the end, the bird prefers freedom in the wild to a pampered life in a cage, for the 'forest cannot be held within a silver dish.'

Lesson 32: Wishing

By: William Allingham

Week: 16

The narrator wishes they were a primrose, a tree, and finally a robin, but worries about the cold and values the sweetness of Mother's kiss.

Lesson 33: I Saw a Little Birdie Fly

By: William Allingham

Week: 17

The narrator asks a bird who it sings to. The bird replies it sings to Amy. The bird asks for payment for its song, a crumb and a smile from Amy.

Lesson 34: A Mountain Round

By: William Allingham

Week: 17

The narrator calls for their neighbors to take hands and dance the round under the moonlight.

Lesson 35: The Leprechaun or the Fairy Shoemaker

By: William Allingham

Week: 18

The narrator asks us whether we have heard the hammer of the Elfin shoemaker working up on the mound. The narrator advises if you capture the shoemaker you may use him to make yourself rich. The narrator saw him once, but before he could capture him the shoemaker threw snuff in his face and disappeared.

Lesson 36: Yes or No?

By: William Allingham

Week: 18

The narrator asks Barnaby whether he wants to go, but Barnaby is indecisive.

Lesson 37: Sleeping

By: William Allingham

Week: 19

The narrator advises the reader to sleep and night and remain awake during the day. The narrator describes nightfall and the nighttime routine of a girl named Emily.

Lesson 38: A Swing Song

By: William Allingham

Week: 19

The poem describes the actions and sensations of swinging.

Lesson 39: Birds' Names

By: William Allingham

Week: 20

The poem describes the characteristics and appearance of various birds.

Lesson 40: Down on the Shore

By: William Allingham

Week: 20

The poem contrasts a sunny day and a stormy day at the shore.

Lesson 41: The Bubble

By: William Allingham

Week: 21

The poem describes the appearance, behavior, and disappearance of a bubble.

Lesson 42: Nick Spence

By: William Allingham

Week: 21

Nick Spence sold his master's cow for far too little money and didn't feel bad about it, so the narrator recommends punishment.

Lesson 43: Ambition

By: William Allingham

Week: 22

The narrator suggests building a city by the sea and hopes to be made king of it.

Lesson 44: The Ball

By: William Allingham

Week: 22

The poem discusses what links all of humanity on Earth.

Lesson 45: Riding

By: William Allingham

Week: 23

A lady and lord riding horseback encounter a poor man riding a donkey. The lord angrily orders the poor man out of their way, and the man refuses. The lady treats the poor man kindly, and he moves off to the side and tips his hat politely.

Lesson 46: Tom Cricket

By: William Allingham

Week: 23

Tom Cricket plays for some dancing Cockroaches until they refuse to bring him some food. When he stops playing, the Cockroaches want revenge, but the Cook and the Scullion interrupt their plot.

Lesson 47: The Year of Hardships

By: William Allingham

Week: 24

In 'The Year of Hardships,' the narrator outlines a year of harsh weather and little food or crops, but feels fortunate they were not born that year.

Lesson 48: A Riddle

By: William Allingham

Week: 24

The poem is a riddle about a little boy who dances, smiles, and nods but cannot speak, breathe, cry, or kiss. (The answer is the little boy is a reflection in a mirror.)

Lesson 49: The Arrow and the Song

By: Henry W. Longfellow

Week: 25

What do an arrow and a song have in common? In, The Arrow and the Song, this clever poem compares firing an arrow and a song, their flight, and their ultimate effects and eventual locations.

Lesson 50: The Babie

By: Jeremiah Eames Rankin

Week: 25

'The Babie' describes the appearance and appeal of an adorable baby.

Lesson 51: Let Dogs Delight to Bark and Bite

By: Isaac Watts

Week: 26

Let Dogs Delight to Bark and Bite advises children they were not meant to bark, bite, growl, and fight like dogs, bears, and lions.

Lesson 52: The Owl and the Pussy-Cat

By: Edward Lear

Week: 26

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat sail on the sea, buy a ring from a piggy, get married, and dance in the light of the moon.

Lesson 53: Little Things

By: Ebenezer Cobham Brewer

Week: 27

Little Things ponders the makeup and the vastness of the sea and of time.

Lesson 54: Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star

By: Old Song

Week: 27

Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star describes the circumstances and surroundings of the twinkling stars in the night sky.

Lesson 55: Pippa's Song

By: Robert Browning

Week: 28

From the play 'Pippa Passes', Pippa's Song describes a peaceful spring morning.

Lesson 56: The Days of the Month

Week: 28

The poem 'The Days of the Month' outlines how many days each month has throughout the year.

Lesson 57: Willie Winkie

By: William Miller

Week: 29

Wee Willie Winkie runs through the town, making sure the children are in bed. Some interpretations of the poem view Willie Winkie as a personification of sleep visiting all the children.

Lesson 58: The Boy Who Never Told a Lie

By: Anonymous

Week: 29

The poem describes a curly-headed boy who always tells the truth and everyone loves him.

Lesson 59: The Wind and the Moon Select Verses

By: George MacDonald

Week: 30

The poem describes the wind's furious attempt to blow out the moon, but the moon doesn't even notice.

Lesson 60: The Flag Goes By Select Verses

By: Henry Holcomb Bennett

Week: 30

The poem describes a parade. The flag comes by and people remove their hats in a show of respect.

Lesson 61: My Old Kentucky Home Select Verses

By: Stephen Collins Foster

Week: 31

The poem describes the happy days of summer within their treasured home of Kentucky, but warns harder times are ahead.

Lesson 62: A Chrysalis

By: Mary Emily Bradley

Week: 31

A little girl finds a chrysalis and the narrator explains a beautiful butterfly will emerge. The little girl dies before the butterfly emerges. When the butterfly sheds its cocoon and flies away, the narrator ponders that like the butterfly, the little girl may have shed her shell to become something even more beautiful.

Lesson 63: The Brook

By: Alfred Tennyson

Week: 32

While lifeforms come and go and live and die, a stream continues on.

Lesson 64: Woodman, Spare That Tree!

By: George Pope Morris

Week: 32

The narrator begs a woodman to save a cherished tree.

Lesson 65: Cupid Drowned

By: Leigh Hunt

Week: 33

The narrator finds Cupid, puts him in a cup of wine, and drinks him. Cupid lives on inside the narrator happily ticking the narrator with his wings.

Lesson 66: Cupid Stung

By: Thomas Moore

Week: 33

Cupid is stung by a bee and runs to his mother, Venus. His mother asks him to imagine how much the sting of love hurts if a mere bee's sting hurts so much.

Lesson 67: The Raven v. 1-3

By: Edgar Allan Poe

Week: 34

The narrator hears a tapping at his door. He feels nervous, but assumes himself it is no more than a visitor knocking.

Lesson 68: The Raven v. 4-6

By: Edgar Allan Poe

Week: 34

The narrator hears a tapping at his door. He opens the door, but no one is there. All he hears is a whisper of the word, 'Lenore.' He goes back into his chamber and the tapping starts again, even louder. He tells himself it is only the wind at his window.

Lesson 69: The Raven v. 7-9

By: Edgar Allan Poe

Week: 35

The narrator hears a tapping and throws open his shutter. A Raven enters and perches above a bust of Pallas Athena, Greek goddess of wisdom. At first the narrator feels relieved. The narrator asks the Raven his name, and the Raven answers, 'Nevermore.'

Lesson 70: The Raven v. 10-12

By: Edgar Allan Poe

Week: 35

The narrator states the Raven will leave tomorrow. The Raven sits on the bust and says 'Nevermore' again. The narrator rationalizes that the bird learned the word from his prior master who suffered some disaster. The narrator sits and looks at the bird, trying to figure out some explanation for what is happening.

Lesson 71: The Raven v. 13-15

By: Edgar Allan Poe

Week: 36

The Raven's eyes burn through the narrator. The narrator smells incense and believes he hears angels nearby. The narrator calls the Raven a wretch and wishes for a potion to make him forget Lenore. The Raven just croaks back, 'Nevermore.' The narrator wonders whether evil sent the Raven or if the Raven has been sent to soothe him. The raven croaks again, 'Nevermore.'

Lesson 72: The Raven v. 16-18

By: Edgar Allan Poe

Week: 36

The narrator asks the Raven whether his soul will be reunited with Lenore in heaven. The Raven says again, 'Nevermore.' The narrator demands the Raven go back to where it came from, but the Raven says in reply, 'Nevermore.' The Raven does not leave, sitting and casting a shadow of sadness over the narrator that shall be lifted nevermore.